Thomas Griffin Media http://thomasgriffinmedia.com Just another WordPress site Mon, 13 May 2013 14:16:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.1 Handy JavaScript Polling Function for Resize and Other Eventshttp://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/05/handy-javascript-polling-function-for-resize-and-other-events/ http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/05/handy-javascript-polling-function-for-resize-and-other-events/#comments Mon, 13 May 2013 14:16:05 +0000 Thomas Griffin http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/?p=1174 I use JavaScript quite often, and a frequent need is for me to poll when a screen is resized and fire some code (or event) at particular intervals. This is often called “polling”, and I’ve created a handy JS function that you can use for all of your polling needs. Here is the polling variable [...]

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I use JavaScript quite often, and a frequent need is for me to poll when a screen is resized and fire some code (or event) at particular intervals.

This is often called “polling”, and I’ve created a handy JS function that you can use for all of your polling needs. Here is the polling variable function:

This variable takes a function and applies another function and polling timer based on parameters set. I use this most commonly with the window.resize event, so here is an example of how you would use this (I’m using jQuery here):

Here we poll the window.resize event every 25ms and fire our anonymous function that is passed into the poll variable. We can check for flags and other things before doing anything if necessary.

This function always comes in handy, so I hope you can make use of it too!

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Business and Solutionshttp://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/05/business-and-solutions/ http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/05/business-and-solutions/#comments Tue, 07 May 2013 19:11:34 +0000 Thomas Griffin http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/?p=1172 I’ve spent the past couple of weeks coding like a mad man for the next big product release, and I finally decided I needed to take a short break. It appears that a new record has been set on ThemeForest for monthly sales. It has been done by the Avada theme, and it has grossed [...]

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I’ve spent the past couple of weeks coding like a mad man for the next big product release, and I finally decided I needed to take a short break.

It appears that a new record has been set on ThemeForest for monthly sales. It has been done by the Avada theme, and it has grossed over $100k for 2 months straight. That is absolutely impressive, and I applaud the creators for their achievement. It’s not an easy feat in a very crowded market space.

There has been quite a stir on Twitter and elsewhere in the WordPress community about the news. Some posts (like here) appear to resent the success. Or maybe not the success – just the mechanism behind the success. Others have praised it (including Envato), and I’d like to chime in with my 2 cents, too.

As you may or may not have read previously, I have begun a tough but important shift from developer to marketer. As this shift has been occurring, I see two very different sides to this story.

Below, I’ll use Genesis as the theme from the developer perspective and Avada as the theme from the user perspective.

The Developer

The developer in me cringes at the thought of someone making 6 figures a month selling a solution far from ideal on the inside. It’s like the new homeowners completely forgot to have the inspector do his usual 3 hour walkthrough to check for structural damage, electrical failures, water leaks and the like and happily bought the home anyway. As an inspector (errmm developer), you would condemn the house in a heartbeat until it was satisfactory from a structural standpoint. Notice structural – that is important.

Structurally Avada is laughable. A whole bunch of inspectors (oh, right, developers) could get together and have quite the jeerfest over how awful it is. That’s cool – the developers have a great time making fun of awful architecture and whatnot.

Are the inspectors living in the house? Of course not – they would never do such a thing! It’s plain unsafe and like walking on already cracking eggshells. They would rather find a house structurally sound (like Genesis) and then build on top of it.

The Marketer / User

I use these interchangeably because as a marketer, you have to become a user or else you will never succeed as a marketer. The user in me sees a huge win in Avada. It’s like looking at that house that is selling for $25 less per square foot in the neighborhood AND has a new roof, new floors, a good-looking paint job and a brand spanking new kitchen with granite countertops. All you can see is the incredible deal that you are getting and the chance to make this new house your own home.

Heck, the home even has alternate style closets that allow for more storage space, a bonus room with ample space for a ping-pong table and even a mudroom for your messy kiddos. And best of all – it is move-in ready. Maybe a couple fixes here and a few strokes of the paintbrush there, but for the most part, it is ready to go.

As far as the user is concerned, the house is primed for moving in and ready to become home. Not a house – a home.

The Case for Solutions

In either case, each party wants some sort of solution that solves their specific problem. In my shift from developer to marketer, I notice more and more that developers tend to forget that they have problems that need solving, too. We are problem solvers by nature – I mean – that’s basically our job, right? Folks come to us with an issue, and we solve it in terms of machine-readable language.

It should be noted that developer problems are just as real as user problems. While developers may be more informed about the problem, it’s still a problem nonetheless. That’s why most skilled WordPress developers would chose something like Genesis over Avada, because it solves their problem in a way that best benefits the solution they are trying to sell. There is absolutely nothing wrong with that – it solves their problem, whatever it may be.

In the same way, Avada solves the problem that best benefits the solution the average user is trying to achieve. Again, there is nothing wrong with this. Avada solves one or more of the problems the user is having, and the user is left happy. It may take a little bit of work to get the solution just right, but that’s ok as long as the solution exists.

It may not even be the easiest solution, but it is a solution.

(Speaking of easy solutions, used a remote lately? Last time I checked I still hunt for the Mute button all the time, but it is way better than getting up and walking to the TV to hunt for it. Ideal? No. But does it work? Yes.)

Where I Stand

I don’t like bad code any more than the next guy. I do code audits all the time to fix that stuff. But I also don’t like giving Genesis over to someone who can barely work with email, either. The case can be made that that person should not be working with websites in the first place, but there also plenty of people that I could argue that should never have gotten their driver’s license either.

I’m not sad that Avada has done so well – again, I applaud them for their success and I hope they continue to be successful. They’ve created a solution that has at least somewhat satisfied 20,000+ people. Is it the best solution? Maybe not, but because I don’t use it, that’s not for me to determine, right?

Let’s get personal – I created and built Soliloquy. I would be foolish to say that Soliloquy is the best solution for everyone needing a slider plugin. Do I believe it is the best slider plugin out there? Absolutely. Do I believe it is always the best solution? Absolutely not. I’m not ashamed of that – it’s just the nature of life. I may think that the new Jaguar XF is the best car out there, but it is absolutely not the best car for a struggling family that is barely making ends meat.

In the end, innovation is going to happen – just look at Ghost. But that doesn’t mean that solutions like Avada can’t be created in the meantime. :-)

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One Year Ago Today, I Began Selling Products…http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/04/one-year-ago-today-i-began-selling-products/ http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/04/one-year-ago-today-i-began-selling-products/#comments Fri, 05 Apr 2013 14:11:12 +0000 Thomas Griffin http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/?p=1170 Today marks the one year anniversary of my first sale of Soliloquy. I remember it being an exciting and uncertain time. I had just convinced a client of mine to purchase my new plugin creation called Soliloquy. They loved it, and I hoped that others would too. I would go on to launch the site [...]

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Today marks the one year anniversary of my first sale of Soliloquy.

I remember it being an exciting and uncertain time. I had just convinced a client of mine to purchase my new plugin creation called Soliloquy. They loved it, and I hoped that others would too. I would go on to launch the site on April 9, 2012 and sell about 20 copies in my first month.

20 copies in a month isn’t a lot (less than one a day), but that meant to me that I found 20 people who thought Soliloquy was worth their money and invested time. I was excited to know that other people caught my vision, too.

Today, a year after the initial launch, looks completely different from back then. Instead of 20 copies a month, it’s better than 20 copies a day. I’ve been blessed to see people purchase Soliloquy and rejoice that it solved their problem. I’ve heard countless testimonials of how Soliloquy “saved the day” for a project, their own personal site and the like. Selling products that solve people’s problems is incredibly humbling and fun.

I’m excited about what’s on the horizon for both Soliloquy and some new exciting products that I am working on. Here’s to one year and hopefully many, many more of building and selling products!

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How to Order the WordPress Users Table by Date Createdhttp://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/04/how-to-order-the-wordpress-users-table-by-date-created/ http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/04/how-to-order-the-wordpress-users-table-by-date-created/#comments Fri, 05 Apr 2013 13:22:15 +0000 Thomas Griffin http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/?p=1169 When you are dealing with a membership-style site, it doesn’t make sense to order the Users table in the admin alphabetically. It makes more sense to order the Users table by date created instead, so I created this code snippet that orders them by the date when the user was registered. Just drop it into [...]

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When you are dealing with a membership-style site, it doesn’t make sense to order the Users table in the admin alphabetically.

It makes more sense to order the Users table by date created instead, so I created this code snippet that orders them by the date when the user was registered. Just drop it into a plugin or your functions.php if you must:

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Focus on What’s Importanthttp://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/03/focus-on-whats-important/ http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/03/focus-on-whats-important/#comments Wed, 27 Mar 2013 18:27:29 +0000 Thomas Griffin http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/?p=1167 In a world of ever evolving distractions, the need to focus on what’s important is crucial. It’s the same philosophy in the world of products and services, but “important” varies from business to business. Have you defined what’s important? Better yet, have you executed on your definition of important? Academia defines lots of things. I say [...]

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In a world of ever evolving distractions, the need to focus on what’s important is crucial.

It’s the same philosophy in the world of products and services, but “important” varies from business to business.

Have you defined what’s important? Better yet, have you executed on your definition of important?

Academia defines lots of things. I say lots of things. But only executing matters.

So I guess my post title should be this: Focus on What’s Important Execute on What’s Important

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How I Increased Soliloquy Sales by 4x in 2.5 Monthshttp://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/03/how-i-increased-soliloquy-sales-by-4x-in-2-5-months/ http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/03/how-i-increased-soliloquy-sales-by-4x-in-2-5-months/#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2013 15:32:17 +0000 Thomas Griffin http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/?p=1165 In just a matter of 2.5 months, I managed to increased sales of my product Soliloquy by 4x. That’s right – 4x the sales (and I mean dollar sales) in just 2.5 months. And heck, one of those months the site was down for an entire week with no sales. It should be more like [...]

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In just a matter of 2.5 months, I managed to increased sales of my product Soliloquy by 4x.

That’s right – 4x the sales (and I mean dollar sales) in just 2.5 months. And heck, one of those months the site was down for an entire week with no sales. It should be more like 5x as much in 2.5 months.

As I began my shift from developer to marketer, one of the easiest ways to wade through the transition was to try and put into practice what I had stirring in my brain. Since I already sold Soliloquy, it made sense to start there and see if what I thought would work would, you know, work. :-)

And by my measure of success, it has worked quite well! Increasing sales by 4x in a matter of 2.5 months was not rocket science, but it required a lot of determined thinking about who I was selling to and why.

Like – a lot of thinking. It took me two solid days of doing nothing but thinking, from writing out user flows on a whiteboard to scribbling down copyrighting and such.

The culmination of all that work has increased sales in a positive way, so here are some of the things I implemented that helped me increase sales and conversions.

1. What You Say Means Everything

I know – this is not earth shattering stuff – but it is unbelievably important. What you say and communicate about your product means everything to your visitors. It is no wonder that good copywriting costs so much money. Text and copywriting are incredibly important. For example, my previous headline for Soliloquy was this:

The Best Responsive WordPress Slider Plugin

“Ok, great. You say it is the best – but how does that help me?!?” I bet that is exactly what visitors thought when they came to the site. I said everything I wanted to support that claim (and I still support it to this day – it is the best), but that doesn’t solve their problem. People don’t buy Soliloquy just because it is the best responsive WordPress slider plugin. People buy Soliloquy because it takes the pain out of creating sliders in WordPress. It’s super easy to use and customize and really fast. As an added bonus, it claims to be the best. THAT’S why people buy Soliloquy.

So it is no wonder that my headline now says:

Create your next responsive WordPress slider in 60 seconds.

Because that’s exactly what people want when they are looking for the best responsive WordPress slider plugin. Period.

2. Offer the Ability to Pay with Credit Card

Good grief. I don’t know how many sales I lost because of PayPal. Yeah – everyone uses it, but their checkout process is miserable. It is slow, requires 5 million steps and gives users way too much time and ability to abandon the process. If I were PayPal, I would hire me to fix that so that they could make more money. But I disgress.

Simply put – offer to purchase with credit card. I now use it as the default payment method, and it is used around 80% of the time. Before I made the changes, I had nothing but PayPal. Don’t get me wrong – PayPal is still a great option because lots of people have PayPal accounts – but almost everyone has a credit card. Don’t forget that.

3. Optimize Your Checkout Experience

Optimizing my checkout experience was one of the single most important features in my marketing updates. My problem is not having enough visitors to the site. If I converted half of the visitors to my site every day, I would be a millionaire by the end of the year. My problem (and most likely your problem too) is converting the visitors already there into customers.

It has been said that checkout abandonment is upwards of 70%. That is a ridiculously high number. Of the tiny percent you are getting to potentially convert, you don’t want 70% of them leaving after they have decided they might want to buy your product.

Here are some of the things I implemented to help the checkout experience:

  1. As soon as a user clicks to add the product to the cart, they are taken to the cart. Don’t assume your user wants to buy more than one thing. If they do, they will instinctively continue shopping. Upsell on the checkout page if you think it is absolutely necessary.
  2. Make your checkout process one page and one step. As soon as you click on purchase with Soliloquy, you’ve bought it. No having to confirm and reconfirm. Reducing the amount of steps and friction to buying your product greatly increases the chances that they will buy.
  3. Use SSL and make sure the user knows it is secure. Even if it is just “perceived”, the customer wants to feel that. Give it to them.
  4. Explain what your input fields do and/or are for. Don’t assume your user knows what a CVV value is. Tell them – even give them an image if necessary. I do with Soliloquy.
  5. Use only one column for the checkout process. Two columns confuse users to no end.

I took a lot of cues about checkout design and reducing cart abandonment from this awesome article on Smashing Magazine.

4. Use Email Marketing to Your Advantage

I didn’t start using email marketing until I made my big design switch in January, and I’m kicking myself for not using it sooner. On one day alone, it drove nearly 7x my average sales numbers a day.

Segment your email lists and target specific groups. For Soliloquy, people who have the developer license don’t need to upgrade, so I segmented the lists (or create a different list altogether) to target only those who can upgrade. You will reduce friction and increase your chances of success by doing something similar with your email lists.

Whatever the case may be, email marketing works. Use it!

5. Design to Convert

When the Soliloquy website was down for a week, I took the time to implement a new conversion-oriented design on the site (the current design). It focuses on converting visitors into customers.

I have tried to design the site in a way that flows. It takes users from the point of “Create your next responsive WordPress slider in 60 seconds.” to seeing the video of me doing it to viewing the features to checking out the Addons and Showcase and then ultimately to buying the product. It’s called flow.

Don’t chop your users up or send mixed messages. Send one message and make it flow throughout your site. That strengthens their impulse to buy because what you are saying is consistent and mentally solves the problem they are facing the entire time they are on your site.

6. Sell an Experience

Ultimately, it all comes down to you selling an experience. People want to experience the ease of creating a responsive WordPress slider in 60 seconds. They want the joy and satisfaction of knowing that their client can manage the home page slider themselves. They want the experience, and Soliloquy just happens to be the path that takes them to it.

Your website/product/service/whatever it may be/ is no different. Sell the experience and let the product reinforce the experience. It creates raving customers who are incredibly loyal to whatever you sell because they associate your product with a positive and happy experience.

By using those 6 ideas (along with some others here and there), I increased Soliloquy sales by 4x in just under 3 months. I didn’t change the product. Soliloquy was and still is the best out there. But I did change how I marketed it to my visitors, and that has made all the difference! :-)

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You Sell Experiences, Not Products and Serviceshttp://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/03/you-sell-experiences-not-products-and-services/ http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/03/you-sell-experiences-not-products-and-services/#comments Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:40:11 +0000 Thomas Griffin http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/?p=1164 Whoa – thems be fighten’ words. As I have begun my transition from developer to marketer, I’m having to do a lot of critical thinking about my business and the products that I sell. The process started after Pressnomics, an epic conference that rattled my brain in a thousand positive ways. I remember thinking and [...]

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Whoa – thems be fighten’ words.

As I have begun my transition from developer to marketer, I’m having to do a lot of critical thinking about my business and the products that I sell. The process started after Pressnomics, an epic conference that rattled my brain in a thousand positive ways. I remember thinking and planning about all my business moves on my 4ish hour flight home from Arizona to NC, and as I began to process and detail the execution of those thoughts, I began to realize a fatal error that I was committing with the way I conducted business.

I was too focused on selling products and services and not experiences.

tl;dr: You don’t sell products or services. You sell experiences.

A 55 year old, retired grandfather goes in to Best Buy to purchase a computer. The computer comes installed with Norton AntiVirus, but he also sees an upsell for Kaspersky (another AntiVirus software). He buys both the computer and Kaspersky. Why?

He didn’t buy a product. He didn’t even buy a service. He bought (whether legitimized or not) peace of mind. He bought an experience.

If you are in the products or services business (which categorizes most people), your main business is in the business of experiences. Your products or services only enhance or detract those experiences, and the faster you learn that, the better off you are going to be (financially, emotionally, et al).

To be sure, I firmly believe that good marketing makes a bad product fail faster. You can’t sell positive, memorable experiences with lackluster products or services. But even then, people are going to remember the experience with your stuff, not the stuff itself.

Let’s look at Nike. The ultimate goal of any products-based company is to take you from a window shopper to a customer.

Nike doesn’t endorse Rory McIIlory just because they want you to buy their stuff. It’s deeper than that. Nike endorses Rory McIlory because they want you to embrace and latch onto the experience of being the #1 golfer in the world like Rory McIlroy, which creates a much deeper, more impressionable experience when you purchase their stuff. See the difference?

I’m working to do this with Soliloquy, the best responsive WordPress slider plugin. There are lots of other slider plugins on the market that have similar features and such. To be sure, Soliloquy does everything better than the competition, but it’s incredibly hard to convince a customer that that is the case.

That’s why purchasing Soliloquy has to be more about the experience than the product itself. I want you to experience relief when it works the first time around. I want you to experience the joy of reduced support when your client can handle everything themselves. I want you to experience Soliloquy, not just buy it.

You sell experiences, my friend, not products and services.

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From Developer to Marketerhttp://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/03/from-developer-to-marketer/ http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2013/03/from-developer-to-marketer/#comments Fri, 08 Mar 2013 02:28:31 +0000 Thomas Griffin http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/?p=1158 The transition process and learning curve has been tough – to say the least. But it is necessary. Absolutely necessary. I never thought I would label myself as a marketer, but as I learn more about my craft and about selling products like Soliloquy, the best responsive WordPress slider plugin, it is more and more [...]

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The transition process and learning curve has been tough – to say the least.

But it is necessary. Absolutely necessary.

I never thought I would label myself as a marketer, but as I learn more about my craft and about selling products like Soliloquy, the best responsive WordPress slider plugin, it is more and more evident that I need to be just as good a marketer as I am a developer – if not better.

If you have not read the book “Rich Dad, Poor Dad”, I encourage you to pick it up and read it. In the book, Robert Kiyosaki outlines and describes his experience with his two fathers: one educated, “poor” dad and one uneducated, “rich” dad. The principles and thought processes behind the book are incredible, but it was a particular story that really gripped me.

Kiyosaki was entertaining an interview with a budding journalist. During the interview process, she had remarked that she would like to be a best-selling author, just like him. Kiyosaki probed the young girl as to why she had not achieved her dream, and she simply uttered that her work, while praised by her peers and friends, “did not go anywhere”. Kiyosaki responded that she should attend some classes that train people to sell, and immediately her countenance shifted and began to look in disgust.

(paraphrased) “A salesperson?? I have a Master’s Degree in English! Why would I want to be a salesperson!??!”. Kiyosaki pointed to some text on a book and told her to read it. “Robert Kiyosaki, best-selling author”, she said, to which Kiyosaki responded “Best-selling author, not best-writing author”.

And that’s when it hit me. That one short story completely changed my thought process behind developing websites and products. I had been focusing on the wrong thing.

Now don’t get me wrong. I still write great code, but it is no longer my primary focus. Great code doesn’t make me a successful product owner. Great code doesn’t make me a successful businessman. Focusing on great code garners me lots of critics who think their code is better than mine, and that’s a rat race that I never care to get involved with for the long haul. There is always going to be someone smarter than me, someone who knows more than me, someone who writes better code than me, someone who _______________.

I’m having to learn how to become a salesman to those who don’t care about code at all. I’m having to learn how to market both myself and my products in a way that convinces and eases clients and customers that I’ve got the solution they need. And let me be the first to tell you that it is completely counterintuitive to what I’ve done the last 2.5 years.

I was a developer. A developer who sought after the reward and praise of other developers. And what did that get me? A few friends, plenty of enemies and lots of wasted time over nit-picky arguments that never amounted to anything that potential customers would care about.

To be sure, I don’t think my time spent as a developer was wasted. On the contrary, I am incredibly grateful for all the things I have learned (and am still learning). But the fact of the matter is: I’ve got to learn how to become a master salesman.

Kiyosaki says that “money should work for you, not you working for money”. E-mything your business means that you work “on your business”, not “in your business”.

I’m tired of working for money in my business. I’m ready to work on my business with money that works for me. And that’s the start of my transition from developer to marketer.

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How to Change the Quality of WordPress Thumbnailshttp://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2012/12/how-to-change-the-quality-of-wordpress-thumbnails/ http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2012/12/how-to-change-the-quality-of-wordpress-thumbnails/#comments Tue, 11 Dec 2012 20:57:54 +0000 Thomas Griffin http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/?p=1146 If you’ve noticed that your thumbnails are not quite as sharp as they should it, it’s because WordPress’ default compression ratio for image generation is not at 100%. I’ve generally found that clients prefer quality images vs. the extra resources needed to generate said images, so this code snippet should in handy for you. This [...]

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If you’ve noticed that your thumbnails are not quite as sharp as they should it, it’s because WordPress’ default compression ratio for image generation is not at 100%.

I’ve generally found that clients prefer quality images vs. the extra resources needed to generate said images, so this code snippet should in handy for you. This code also addresses images being resized via the new WP_Image_Editor class that was just released with WordPress 3.5.

While the old filter only handled the compression quality of JPG images, if your instance utilizes ImageMagick, the new filter applies the compression ratio to other image types as well. The filter expects an integer based on the scale of 1-100. WordPress defaults to 90, so feel free to leave it as it is or change it to whatever you may need it to be!

**Note: This will only apply to thumbnails and images generated after you have inserted the code into your theme. If you want this to apply to existing images and thumbnails, you should use a plugin like Regenerate Thumbnails to create new, better quality images with the updated compression ratio.

It should also be noted that if you decide to extend the new WP_Image_Editor class, you can set the quality of images individually via the WP_Image_Editor::set_quality() method. The filter listed above trumps this method as it is set on a global scale, but it can be useful for individual instances of creating new image sizes if a global filter doesn’t fit the bill.

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How to Easily Add Custom Classes to Your First and Last Menu Items in WordPresshttp://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2012/12/how-to-add-custom-classes-first-last-menu-items-wordpress/ http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/blog/2012/12/how-to-add-custom-classes-first-last-menu-items-wordpress/#comments Mon, 10 Dec 2012 20:41:44 +0000 Thomas Griffin http://thomasgriffinmedia.com/?p=1144 Sometimes you want to be able to style your first and/or last menu items differently from the rest. Maybe you want to remove padding, shift margins, or the like. I’ve got an easy solution to add custom classes to both the first and last menu items in your menus so that you can style each [...]

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Sometimes you want to be able to style your first and/or last menu items differently from the rest. Maybe you want to remove padding, shift margins, or the like.

I’ve got an easy solution to add custom classes to both the first and last menu items in your menus so that you can style each appropriately. This is done with code on the server side, so the effects applied are instant, and you never have to worry about someone changing classes inside the menu admin area in WordPress.

**Note: I am assuming you are using WordPress 3.0 navigation menus in the tutorial.

The code snippet below will apply the classes to all menus on your site:

If you want to go a step further and limit this to only a particular navigation menu on your site, check out the code below:

This limits the classes being applied to the primary navigation menu only. You could extend this to include or exclude other registered navigation menus for your site.

Now if you have noticed above, these two pieces of code are really only effective for top level menus (e.g. menus with no dropdowns). If you want to add the same class structure to nested menus, use the code below. It will do the exact same thing as above, except for it will apply the logic to all nested submenus in your menu structure.

You can take the logic from the second bit of code and apply it to this as well if you only want this to work on particular menus.

Simply comment out classes that you don’t need (e.g. no custom class on the first menu item), and you should be all set! I use this on basically every project I do, so hopefully you will find it useful too!

The post How to Easily Add Custom Classes to Your First and Last Menu Items in WordPress appeared first on Thomas Griffin Media.

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